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Patricia Brooke

Based on a 1963 Walter Tevis novel, The Man Who Fell to Earth is touring the country in a new 35-mm print and full running time (original distribution in the US suffered from a 20-minute excision). Playing to full theaters in New York and Los Angeles, the film bears re-visiting; it’s entertaining and thought-provoking as well as just plain easy on the eyes. Read more

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Courtesy of IFC Films

If you enter the theater with memories of Graham Greene’s novel, or its earlier cinematic adaptation, you may leave the theater put off; but if you’re looking for entertainment over art, you’ll find the time in the theater well spent. Read more

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1964, when Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters made their legendary trip across America in "Furthur," the psychedelic bus, they shot a lot of film; most of it has never been seen until now. Read more

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Errol Morris returns to form in his most recent full-length feature, Tabloid. His past three films have tackled serious, hard, newsworthy subjects—grappling with the legacy of war from the Nazis, through Viet Nam, to Abu Ghraib. Joyce McKinney, the subject of his latest release, is indeed newsworthy, though less likely to appear in the pages of the New York Times than in those of the National Enquirer or its British counterparts, Evening News and Daily Mirror. Read more

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Photograph courtesy of ATO Pictures

It’s not likely that you’ll mistake Terri for the garden-variety teen outsider film that features either a) a lovable loser; b) a fatalistic loner; or c) a successfully self-reliant outcast.  Whi... Read more

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Mike Mills pitches "Beginners" as a romance fanciful enough to capture an audience’s wishful thinking, but realistic enough about the struggles of romantic relationships to keep us engaged and believing. Plus it features a cute dog who communicates telepathically through captions. Risky? Absolutely. Overboard? It works. Read more

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Last month, Look/Listen film writers Patricia Brooke and Andrew Wyatt got an early look at "The Tree of Life," the Palm d’Or-winning fifth feature from legendary filmmaker Terrence Malick. This week, they sat down to discuss the highly anticipated film, which opens today at the Landmark Tivoli Theater. Read more

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Takashi Miike's new film is a nearly perfect kick-off for the summer film season, an action-packed film capped by a 45+ minute battle scene but held together by big-picture questions of masculine identity, loyalty, and a life well-led. Read more

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Kelly Reichardt’s Meek’s Cutoff deftly walks the line between methodical and downright plodding in its pace and plot. A Western that strips away many of the genre’s populist conventions, Meek’s Cut... Read more

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In his second feature film, Xavier Dolan, darling of Cannes as director of I Killed My Mother ( J’ai tué ma mére ) that won three prizes at the 2009 Directors’ Fortnight, wears his heart on his s... Read more

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On Friday, St. Louis expat James Gunn visits the Tivoli for the opening of "Super," starring Rainn Wilson. Click for the review, and info on Pi's new "Super"-themed pizza. Read more

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South Korean director Lee Chang-dong's affecting new film follows a 60-something woman as she takes a poetry class—and uses what she learns to cope with the truly monstrous. Read more

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This ultra-violent Korean horror film is far more than genre cinema; it surprises with subtle plot twists, artful cinematography and some great performances. Read more

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The newest animated feature from Sylvain Chomet ("The Triplets of Belleville"),is gorgeously rendered, bittersweet, and downright magical. Read more

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Ellie Kemper and Stephen Dorff in "Somewhere." Photo by Merrick Morton

Kemper talks about "The Office," The Onion, her new movie "Somewhere," and sharing a real (not diet!) coke with Sofia Coppola. Read more

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Photo by Niko Tavernise, courtesy of Fox Searchlight

Director Darren Aronofksy (Pi, Requiem for a Dream, The Fountain, The Wrestler) has garnered tremendous critical and popular attention. It’s not clear, though, whether audiences, critics, or even Aronofsky see the comedy contained within his hyperbolic cinema. Read more

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Courtesy First Run Features

Seemingly miles away from the subjects of Pennebaker’s signature documentaries, Don’t Look Back and The War Room, Kings of Pastry follows several men as they prepare for and compete in the prestigious MOK, Meilleurs Ouvilliers de France. Read more

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Courtesy IFC Films

Francis Costello, a French restaurateur with suspiciously good marksmanship, takes up his daughter’s demand for vengeance after her family is wiped out by Triad hitmen. Why is irrelevant. Who is largely irrelevant. It’s the how that the film takes up with so much joie de vivre. Read more

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Courtesy of Strand Releasing

Boonmee (Thanapat Saisaymar) is dying of kidney disease, and has traveled to the jungles of northern Thailand—the site, he believes, of his past lives—for his final days. Read more

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Image courtesy of Magnolia Films

Based on the work of “rogue” economist Steven D. Levitt and journalist Stephen J. Dubner, the film assembles a who’s who of contemporary documentarians who create four distinct shorts held deftly together by interstitials written and directed by Seth Gordon. Read more

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