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Look-Listen February 2011

If you’re at all familiar with Carl Phillips’ poems, you know that his austere lines, and stark, spare stanzas are incredibly intimidating and imposing. Every word, every simple punctuation mark, holds such weight that you’re done in by the end of one poem. In Double Shadow, Phillips’ allows his lines to achieve paragraph-fullness, and for that, it is easily his most accessible, inviting book to date. Read more

Culture

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Hiromi Photo by Muga Muyahara, courtesy of Telarc

American artists wrote the book on jazz piano wizardry. But the best new artists of the 21st century are players like Hiromi, a young Japnese pianist whose work is marked by daredevil tempo changes and wide contrasts in dynamics. Read more

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This weekend: The Dirty Dozen Brass Band at the Sheldon, the Dog Parade in Soulard, a birthday brunch for Dr. Seuss and Tchaikovsky’s final symphony at the Sheldon. Read more

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Courtesy of Ladue Yacht Club

Let’s be honest—from tiny rural towns to the biggest city, provincialism can be found in every province, and it probably lives to some degree within us all. That’s a philosophy you might consider adopting when reading the “Ladue Yacht Club” page on Facebook. Read more

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Notice I didn't say, "five great movies about rock 'n' roll." Read more

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"Possum Promenade," from The Bloody Bucket series

SLUMA is the first local museum to show a large-scale career retrospective of his work. And like one of Huck's prints, that's not a small thing. Read more

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Inspired by the BP oil spill, this little book is meant not only to be read but, like the spill itself, to spread consciousness. Read more

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Asylum Street Spankers photo by Tiffany Snyder-Hofeldt

Humorous poetry at White Flag Projects, apocalyptic poetry at River Styx, a new suite of shows at the Sheldon Galleries, the Asylum Street Spankers' last show at Off Broadway, and a little bit of Mardi Gras in Forest Park. Read more

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Though Biutiful's bleak vision will be challenging for some viewers, it also holds moments of beauty and poignancy. Read more

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He contributed to a kids' album, Healthy Food for Thought, that lost out to Julie Andrews' poetry recording. But hey, getting nominated is no small thing! Read more

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A chat with the songwriter behind the catchiest TV themes of the 70s (not to mention hits like "I've Got a Name") about his new memoir, "Killing Me Softly." Read more

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Photograph by Joe Henson

Wilkerson will be at the St. Louis County Library Headquarters tomorrow, February 9, to read from “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration,” which the Boston Globe called “one of the most lyrical and important books of the season.” Read more

Culture

The newest animated feature from Sylvain Chomet ("The Triplets of Belleville"),is gorgeously rendered, bittersweet, and downright magical. Read more

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In 1811, a giant of music, Franz Liszt, was born in Hungary; in 1911 the life of another giant, Gustav Mahler, ended. The lives of both profoundly impacted music in ways that we are still learning to fathom. As we reflect on their legacies in 2011, some fascinating parallels emerge. Read more

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NEA chair and St. Louis expat Rocco Landesman sets off a blogosphere firestorm by suggestion there's "too much theater"—or at least too many arts administrators, anyway. Read more

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This week: a lecture on St. Louis’ lost cast-iron riverfront buildings, Thelonius Kryptonite at Gya, Pokey LaFarge at the Tap Room, and an after-hours spelling bee. Read more

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